New passenger discovers TSA grope policy

TSAgrope
ADDENDUM March 1, 2016: Since I originally wrote this post, two years ago, the weasely, lying, criminal TSA has, of course, eliminated several of the pages to which I linked. If you click on those links today, you’ll get an error message: “Page Not Found.” Why is it not found? Who knows? Because the TSA is incompetent? Because it doesn’t want people to learn what its policies are, we the people who pay every stinking salary at that stinking agency? I don’t know. But I do know that I’ve gone through hundreds of past posts I’ve done at TSA News and corrected, repeatedly, broken links, only to find, later, that they become broken once again. I give up. The TSA is trying to hide its policies because its policies are abusive. And when it doesn’t outright hide them, it tries to obfuscate them with weasely language. So take what you will from this post. Everything I wrote here is accurate and true and was backed up with empirical evidence. The TSA’s hiding or removing of that evidence is par for the course. -LS
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Charlotte Ann Kimbrough is a 57-year-old retired law enforcement professional. She worked for 32 years in an administrative capacity with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, and other federal law enforcement agencies. She has two metal hip replacements. 

She told me she hadn’t flown in a few years. So she was unfamiliar with TSA procedures. When she went through the metal detector at the St. Louis airport on Thursday, May 22, 2014, she alarmed it. She explained to the TSA agents that she has two metal hips. She thought they would wand her. She was wrong.

Our readers know why. The TSA stopped using handheld metal detectors as of October 30, 2010, when John Pistole implemented the Reign of Molestation, and as travelers can attest. If you see a TSA clerk using a metal detector wand today, it’s a rare occurrence, and is not TSA policy. Patdowns are the policy.

Kimbrough was taken aside and told she needed to have a “pat-down.” She was asked if she wanted to be taken to a private room. “No way,” she said. “I don’t believe these things should be done in secret.”

Still, she didn’t know what to expect. Since she had never had an “enhanced pat-down,” she was shocked at what happened.

“The woman groped my crotch — twice. She went underneath my dress. I knew I had to be calm for the man I was traveling with, so I didn’t say anything. But he could see the look on my face. He started yelling. They got the woman who was groping me out of the way and brought in a boss, who tried to stop the situation from escalating.”

Kimbrough’s companion demanded a TSA complaint form.

Ha! We all know what happens to those. They go into the circular file. At most you might get a form letter.

Kimbrough told me she doesn’t relish the thought of having to fly home, nor of taking future trips already scheduled with her companion. She also thought that going through the strip-search scanner would obviate the need for a grope. I disabused her of that notion. As tens of thousands of people can confirm, as we’ve written repeatedly, and as the TSA itself proclaims, just because you go through the scanner doesn’t mean you won’t also be pulled aside for a grope. The two aren’t mutually exclusive.

For the record, TSA clerks are not supposed to go under your clothing, yet as we know they do it all the time. Just ask Lynsie Murley. Or Carolyn Durand. Or Sommer Gentry. Or Maggie Yates Buckenmayer. Or Jamelyn Steenhoek. Or this man. Or these people. Or these. Or these.

From the TSA website:

A passenger should not be asked to remove or lift any article of clothing to reveal a sensitive body area.

With such weasely language (“should not”), I suppose the clerk in this case could claim she didn’t ask Kimbrough to do anything; she just went under Kimbrough’s skirt all on her own.

Kimbrough also said something very interesting about her reaction, confirming what we’ve been writing here for years about the effect the TSA is having on the country:

“I do have anger at myself, that I let her do it to to me. And the more she did it, the more I let her. I keep getting feelings of guilt.”

Bringing out my broken record again, one of the most pernicious effects of authoritarianism is that it engages its victims as complicit in their own abuse. Kimbrough has no reason to feel guilty. She did nothing wrong. Yet the system in place — a system entirely predicated not on security but on compelling obedience — encourages her to believe she did.

Kimbrough also drew a parallel that many of us have drawn, one that’s entirely appropriate yet that elicits howls of derision from people more comfortable living in denial than in facing reality — she brought up the “N” word: “Nazi.”

Godwin adherents can stuff it.

As law professor Butler Shaffer has written about the TSA:

Its function has absolutely nothing to do with combating “terrorism.” There are no more “terrorists” running loose in this country than there were “bogeymen” with which I used to scare my little sisters when we were children. One need only read Viktor Frankl’s book, Man’s Search for Meaning to discover that, like Frankl’s Nazi concentration camp experiences, the TSA’s role is to degrade and dehumanize people; to remind us that the state can humiliate us to any degree it chooses whenever it chooses, and that those who resist will be punished and put on secret lists for some undefined future use.

Kimbrough went on to say that she wished she had resisted somehow, even perhaps kicked the TSA agent groping her. I told her that would’ve gotten the police called and her charged with assault. They can touch you all they want, I said, but you can’t defend yourself.

There are other ways to resist.

Kimbrough told me her companion is a frequent flyer. So I asked her how it was possible that he hadn’t seen these searches conducted before. Her reply:

“I don’t think people are paying attention. I mean, it’s going on right in front of everybody, but I guess until it happens to them they don’t care.”

Ah, well.

I’ll add Charlotte Kimbrough’s name and account to the vast list of TSA crimes and abuses. Chalk up another one for the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.

(Cross-posted at ABombazine)

  • jon

    I am a former TSA security screener. I started nearly a year ago but had to resign after five months because my job was in jeopardy. I did not muster a certification I needed but received only minimal training and tested the same day I was first exposed to certain equipment. I had never been late- never missed a day and my shift started at 03:45 so it was a challenge getting up every morning for a four-hour shift. I was formally advised that I may lose my job and had to sign a form they use for disciplinary action , even though I was told this was not a disciplinary issue. My more experienced co-workers advised me to resign because no one, in my circumstances is allowed to stay. Granted, you want qualified people doing the job but if you had seen some of the crap like I did, at one of the nations most high profile airports- you would scratch your head and wonder. I will tell you that my co-workers really do care about security but TSA management is garbage and that is the basic problem with the organizations from what I experienced. The qualifications are low, training is minimal and there is always the constant threat of losing your job and I would say that morale sucks but there doesn’t appear to be any. No one trusts management- not even the supervisors. Benefits are good, I will give you that but the pay band is too low.
    As a traveler, I have never had an issue with any screener so like any organization- there are good employees and there are bad ones. TSA needs to make changes but it has to start with management. And as far as the union which represents the TSOs- what a joke ! that is all I can say about them.

    • nicko

      The only change needed is to scuttle the agency.

      • Daisiemae

        Amen to that one! No amount of gravy is going to salvage this burned turkey.

  • Susan Richart

    About Mr. Greyman, who is apparently a self-designated lieutenant in the “Northwest Volunteer Army,” an arm of the Northwest Front.

    From the Northwest Front’s webpage:

    The Northwest Front is a political organization of Aryan men and women in the United States and Canada, of all ages and social backgrounds, who recognize that an independent and sovereign White nation in the Pacific Northwest is the only possibility for the survival of the White race on this continent.

    http://northwestfront.org/about/

    Read it and puke.

    • Great sleuthing, Susan. Thanks for outing him.

  • Sunny

    >If you buy a ticket to fly on a commercial aircraft and enter an airport you volunteer for whatever they want to do to you. Don’t like it? Don’t fly.

    On the off chance you aren’t just trolling…..

    So, according to you, the right answer is to avoid anything that might require work to change. We should accept anything the gov’t sends our way – racial slurs, misogynistic actions, stealing our stuff, molesting our kids – if we want to fly. If we don’t like it, then we’re always free to leave. Do I have that right?

    And if someday the government decides that before we can fly they get to beat us, make us submit to anal probes, force us to give a pint of blood, then we should all be okay with that or don’t fly? Really?

    >And don’t give me that crap line that you have no choice. Yes, you do.
    >Your freedom can only be taken from you if you allow it, but keeping it comes with a price.

    That’s not how I remember the creation of DHS or TSA coming about. And the longer those agencies exist, the harder it will be to disband them.

    >On Memorial Day we hear the statement, “Freedom isn’t free”, a lot. For a lot of people it seems to be a meaningless phrase.
    Well? Do you want your freedom? If you do be prepared to pay for it.
    If you’re not willing to pay for it, quit whining and be a good little sheeple.

    I’m not sure what you’re suggesting, but it sounds like you’re advocating violence. I hope I’m wrong. There are other ways to fight. Not flying is one way (not out of avoidance like you suggest, but out of protest), and opting out of the scanners if you do fly. On the rare occasions when I have to fly, I opt out and I make sure everyone near me knows what I’m doing. I almost always get one other person to opt out with me. Those TSA people just can’t get rid of me fast enough because I just don’t shut up.

  • SteveP

    If you buy a ticket to fly on a commercial aircraft and enter an airport you volunteer for whatever they want to do to you. Don’t like it? Don’t fly.
    And don’t give me that crap line that you have no choice. Yes, you do.
    Your freedom can only be taken from you if you allow it, but keeping it comes with a price.
    On Memorial Day we hear the statement, “Freedom isn’t free”, a lot. For a lot of people it seems to be a meaningless phrase.
    Well? Do you want your freedom? If you do be prepared to pay for it.
    If you’re not willing to pay for it, quit whining and be a good little sheeple.

    • 1amwendy

      So I have paid a steep price (as in, employment) for refusing to be a “good little sheeple”… but SteveP, where does it say that we can’t protest mightily against what we see as wholesale assault of the traveling public ( especially those that require some sort of medical assistive device).? I have my freedom, I have paid a very steep price, but I will never go quietly into that night.

    • RonBonner

      While I agree in general with what you are saying I think you have a couple of points wrong.

      First, NO we do not volunteer for anything TSA wants to do. We volunteer for a LIMITED ADMINISTRATIVE SEARCH solely designed to find WEI. There is nothing in that suggesting crotch and breast groping is called for nor complying with whatever orders are tossed out by TSA clerks. TSA is bound to follow laws and regulations and failure to do so should result in severe punitive actions against the TSA clerks.

      Second, choosing not to fly is no guarentee that you can avoid TSA vermin. Trains, buses, local transportation, sporting venues, and political events have all been infested by TSA, not to mention your towns, schools, churches, and other local places in your own backyard.

      I say we should force TSA’s hand. Document each and every incident. Submit complaints to DHS OIG, electeds, and local media. Name and shame TSA clerks and shun TSA employees living in your communities.

      I’m willing to fight for my freedoms. The question is if TSA has the same convictions? I think not!

      • Guest

        “Name and shame TSA clerks and shun TSA employees living in our communities.”

        gsoltso = West = West Cooper, Pleasant Garden, NC

    • Chris Bray

      If we don’t have high school dropouts in airports massaging the genitals of random retirees who want to fly to Cleveland…we won’t have freedom. Because freedom isn’t free, so crotch massage!

      Wow.

    • Susan Richart

      “Your freedom can be taken from you only if you allow it…”

      And that’s why so many of us are fighting the TSA tooth and nail. That’s why Edward Snowden spoke up about the NSA.

      Submitting to the TSA at airport checkpoints is NOT paying a price for freedom; submission is capitulation to an agency that is totally out of control and to the police state this country is becoming.

    • Daisiemae

      Yes, indeed, freedom isn’t free. So why aren’t you paying up? Why aren’t you stepping up to the plate and fighting back against the theft and destruction of our freedoms instead of criticizing those who are fighting back? Why don’t you pay your share?

      “Your freedom can only be taken from you if you allow it, but keeping it comes with a price?” I guess you decided the price is too high. That must be why you do nothing but try to undermine those who are willing to pay the price.

    • Lt. Greyman, NVA

      Steve, here is my problem. I would be annoyed but accepting if this search rule was accompanied by a program to eliminate Islam from this land, so that we might get back to narmalicy. The problem is, we are importing muslims left and right. When I was a kid, they used to say, “Take this plane to Havana!” or “Take this plane to Lybia!”. Now they crash the planes in the name of Allah, or stuff c4 up their ass or in their water bottle.

      Mass searches are not a fix, this should be a temporary problem till the removal of Islamics is complete. Instead, we have said, “You can’t exclude Muslims!” while reducing Rights for normals, thus warping an entire culture.

      • Oh, baloney. 3 billion Muslims in the world, and they’re all Big Scary Terrorists? I guess you would’ve been in favor of the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII, too? One of the many dark stains upon this country’s history.

        And “normals”?? Really?? Sick.

      • Susan Richart

        You are one sick dude. Fortunately, even though you might not believe it, you are in a small minority.

      • Daisiemae

        A devotee of the Final Solution, are you? You see how well that worked out for Hitler.

        • Lt. Greyman, NVA

          I did not say kill. But removal back to their lands. If they wish to live under Sharia law and bloweach other up, then they can do it in their land. I fyou like it Dasise, you can join them

          • Daisiemae

            I repeat…one sick bastard.

          • I bet the American Indians wish you’d go back to your “tribal lands,” too.

          • Susan Richart

            A white supremacist speaks.

            “Given the shaky psychology of many white supremacists and, as Simi noted, their drinking problems and inability to hold jobs,…”

            Bet this describes you to a “T”, greyman.

          • Michael Landers

            Superiority is the favored shield for the pride of the ignorant

  • I’m reposting something from the NYT from 4 years ago; this is also in the Master List:

    . . . “I didn’t really expect her to touch my vagina through my pants,” said Kaya McLaren, an elementary schoolteacher from Cle Elum, Wash., who was patted down at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport last Saturday because the body scanner detected a tissue and a hair band in her pocket.

    . . . According to information the T.S.A. has shared or published, the airport pat-downs are supposed to be conducted by officers the same sex as the traveler, and passengers can request a private screening and have a traveling companion present during the search. Agents are not permitted to look inside passengers’ underwear or reach inside a skirt . . . .

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/19/business/19security.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=tsa&st=cse

    • Susan Richart

      Also from the article:

      “For passengers, one frustration is that the agency, citing security reasons, has declined to release specific guidelines about how the pat-downs are conducted or what agents are permitted to touch.”

      How can one research procedures when those procedures aren’t published?

      • Yes and no. We’ve known since 2010 that front-of-the-hand gropes were the new normal — that was widely publicized — we’ve known about the euphemism “resistance,” also widely publicized, and we certainly know from hundreds of thousands of eyewitnesses what’s going on.

        I don’t care anymore what the TSA says or doesn’t say, publishes or doesn’t publish about its security assaults. We know the agency lies as a matter of course, and we know what its clerks are doing to people in airports every day.

        • RonBonner

          It’s clear that TSA has used dishonesty and lies as a regular tool to mislead and hide from the public what TSA is about.

          TSA spokespeoples, TSA’s Blogger Bob Burns and other TSA bloggers, all the way up to TSA Administrator John S. Pistole have repeatedly, and in my opinion, intentionally lied to the public.

          What we know about employees of TSA is that they have no ethics, no honor, and no integrity.

          Why would anyone trust these people?

  • Veritas

    Hell we asked for a police state and they gave it to us good. What do you think Obama meant about transforming the nation?

    • I agree we’re living in a police state, but that’s been the case for decades. Obama didn’t start it; he has, however, continued it. You think Romney or McCain would’ve been any different?

      No candidate anywhere in any race around the country is talking about TSA abuse or taking it seriously. This isn’t a Dem/Repub thing. Even Rand Paul, after his experience, hasn’t done shit. Nobody in Congress has.

      Talk is cheap. And politicians are full of talk.

      • RonBonner

        Obama promised change. What he has delivered makes Bush look like a rookie.

        I personally think Romney would have been a good President. Damn sure couldn’t do worse than Obama.

        • I think Obomney is . . . well, you get the picture. Two peas in a pod is another way of putting it.

          And for the purposes of our discussion re the National Security State, Romney wouldn’t have done anything differently. We’d still be embroiled in Afghanistan, we’d still be murdering people via drone, we’d still be assaulting people at the airport. (As an aside, a guy who straps his dog to the roof of his car doesn’t exactly have a lot of sympathy for his fellow beings.)

          • RonBonner

            We don’t know how Romney would have performed. If you do know then you’re in the wrong business.

  • Dolt

    She told me she hadn’t flown in a few years. So she was unfamiliar with TSA procedures.

    Head in the sand. You are only “unfamiliar” if you willfully avoid any information regarding the TSA because “as long as it doesn’t happen to me, what do I care?”

    • Susan Richart

      I don’t see this as “head in the sand.” If one doesn’t do something on a regular basis, why should one be familiar with the procedures associated with that activity?

      I recently wanted to rent a bike to ride through a park. I was told that I had to wear a helmet or I could not ride. In my state, there is no law that says an adult has to wear a helmet so it never occurred to me that one would be required. While not on the same level, my experience with the bike and the helmet is the same as the novice flyer and the TSA.

      Further, even if Ms. Kimbrough had researched TSA procedures, where is it written that a screener could put her hand up under a skirt to touch the genital area? It’s not written because the screener did not follow procedure on the grope.

      “as long as it doesn’t happen to me, what do I care?” I have a feeling that if Ms. Kimbrough had seen another woman being treated as she was, she would have been extremely upset.

      • Daisiemae

        Amazingly enough, there are still multitudes of people who do not realize what is actually happening.

        Nobody reads newspapers anymore. I can’t remember the last time I sat and watched the news on TV. It’s been well over ten years. If you’re not particularly looking for it on the internet, you won’t see it.

        I can easily understand how people who don’t fly wouldn’t know or understand what is happening. After all, who could imagine that our government would force sexual assault upon us? Such a thing was unthinkable prior to 2010.

      • Dolt

        You have a good point. I will give you the fact that people have different experiences and levels of awareness of things around them. However, I don’t think your scenario with bike helmets is close to the same as TSA. A very local, private bike rental company with a helmet policy that people are not aware of is completely realistic. But a huge, Federal agency that is talked about in every possible media outlet including comics, music, entertainment TV shows and movies as well as news and internet outlets, could only be avoided if you are intentionally ignoring it.

        That’s just my personal opinion, and perhaps in this particular case, I am wrong about this woman. I just simply can’t imagine being that blocked off to the entire world around you that much, but again, that’s just me.

        And I am by no means blaming this woman. She is clearly a victim of abuse just as much as the rest of us and everyone on the Master List (and more). My only point is that if more people would open their eyes and become more aware of the world around them and stop for one second to think about how it may directly effect them instead of waiting for it to actually cause them a problem, perhaps the problems can be corrected much quicker. Instead, we will have generations of abuse until enough people are directly, personally effected enough to want to change it. That’s why it bothers me.

        • Daisiemae

          Every day I meet people who have never heard about these issues. A couple of weeks ago, I was out shopping. I saw the famous Jimmy Choo grenade bottle. I told the salespeople all about it and they were flabbergasted. The good news is that every one of them thought the TSA screener took it for himself/herself.

          About a month ago, I was talking to someone who had never heard about the infamous cupcake confiscation.

          A couple of weeks ago, I was buying an evening gown at a bridal shop. I saw one of the dangerous brass knuckle pocket books. I told the people at the bridal salon how TSA rescued a plane load of people from a pocket book. They were stunned. They never heard of it. They actually made a note of it to tell brides who are planning a destination wedding to ship the pocket book to the destination so TSA would not confiscate it.

          It’s easy for us to lose sight of the fact that for a large percentage of people this is a hidden issue. We are hyper alert and we search out every news item regarding TSA. But a huge number of people are so caught up in all the stress of everyday life that they are not searching the internet and they really don’t know about all this stuff.

          • Daisiemae, you’re quite right. Certainly about the specifics — of cupcakes, perfume, purses, etc. But the hands-on gropes? Anybody who doesn’t know about those by now isn’t paying attention. (And of the people who do know, most of them are just hoping it doesn’t happen to them. I know; I talk to them all the time. Friends and colleagues who just don’t give a shit, as long as it happens to someone else.)

          • Daisiemae

            I know plenty of those people too…the ones who don’t care as long as it doesn’t happen to them. They make me sick.

            But there are plenty of people just like Charlotte Ann Kimbrough who are simply not aware of it. They don’t fly and they don’t surf the internet and they don’t watch the news. People around them aren’t talking about it. So how else would they know about it?

            While I have initiated countless conversations with friends and strangers about TSA, not one person has ever initiated a conversation about TSA with me. (Yes, I do talk to strangers…every Southerner does that. The things you can learn standing on the supermarket line!)

            So if someone doesn’t fly, doesn’t surf the net, doesn’t watch the news, and doesn’t hear anyone talking about it, then of course they don’t know about it.

            On top of that, I learned in marketing that you have to put something in front of a person 7 times before they notice it. And that was before the onslaught of media that we live with today.

            With the media blitz we are subjected to these days, we are assaulted daily by gigantic avalanches of information. Many people just turn their brains off to escape from the overload. With that scenario, it will take far more than 7 times for a person to notice anything that they do not already have a personal interest in.

          • Daisiemae

            Update: I just asked my husband if he ever heard anything about the TSA gropes (independent of what I have told him or directed to his attention). He said he has not.

            He says that he looks at CNN. As he frantically tries to solve the constant crises inherent in corporate life while trying to juggle the personal minutiae that we all deal with on a daily basis, he glances over the website. He says there might be 20 things on the site. if there is anything about TSA, it’s only one of 20 and watered down. If he doesn’t click on it and spend time reading the article, all he sees is the headline if that. With so many things fighting to claim his attention, he says he has never noticed anything about TSA independent of articles that I have brought to his attention. (That doesn’t mean the articles weren’t there. It means he didn’t notice them.)

            And keep in mind, he already knows about it because of me….and yet he’s never seen anything. People who don’t already know about it have even less probability of noticing anything while they are struggling just to keep up with the stresses of daily life.

          • Daisiemae

            Oh, and one more thing, the first time I ever heard about the scanners I didn’t believe it. I figured it was just some anti-government nut job. What decent law-abiding citizen could believe that the government of the United States would do such a thing?

            So it took more than once for me to know about it. And then I only knew about it because I actively searched for it. When I finally realized that the scanners were for real, I was so obsessed that I spent every waking moment searching for information on the internet. The average person simply is not doing that.

  • Susan J. Barretta

    Great article, and Lisa rocks maintaining the master list.

    • Daisiemae

      Amen to that, sister!

  • Sporty_Teacher

    Perhaps she could try to go to the media???

    I agree with filing a criminal complaint. At least give it a try like the Denver woman did. Even though she was unsuccessful, if enough people started doing this, maybe somebody would get the picture. All it would take is one.

    • The media has been publishing these stories for years. Nothing changes. And as long as people keep flying, and keep looking the other way, nothing will change.

      • Chris Bray

        The weird thing is that police regularly arrest the shock troops of the Gröpencorps, but only for stealing and drug smuggling and off-duty rape and child porn and overseas travel for sex with children and, well, all the usual TSA behaviors. But for actual hand-on-junk checkpoint assault? Nothing. Ever. Why are the police willing to give just this one behavior a pass?

        • Sporty_Teacher

          I’m guessing here, but maybe there hasn’t been evidence, at least solid enough, to prompt an arrest?

          I’ve often wondered what would result if the following happend:

          1) a passenger asks a cop to witness the patdown

          2) the passenger tells both the cop and TSA clerk before the patdown that he/she does not consent to touching of genitals

          3) the clerk performs the patdown and touches genitals anyway in front of the cop

          • Chris Bray

            TSA genital massage areas are videotaped — in the present case, there should be footage of the clerk’s hand penetrating deep into the inner recesses of the passenger’s “security threat.” But would any law enforcement agency ever bother to really investigate?

          • RonBonner

            No video in the rape rooms and TSA controls who sees video if there is any.

          • Chris Bray

            This victim declined private groping, and had a public gate rape.

          • Susan Richart

            Isn’t the correct procedure for the groper to feel the passenger up through the skirt material.

            Any video, if the TSA could find it, should at least show the groper lifting the dress and putting her hand up someplace.

            It is giving me the shivers as I type this to know that this groper actually touched the woman’s gential area with nothing more than, presumably, her underwear, acting as a barrier.

          • “Isn’t the correct procedure for the groper to feel the passenger up through the skirt material.”

            Yes, that’s the correct procedure, as stated by John Pistole himself, but we know they violate their own procedures all the time.

            “Any video, if the TSA could find it, should at least show the groper lifting the dress and putting her hand up someplace.”

            Good luck with that. You know how often incriminating video mysteriously goes missing.

            “It is giving me the shivers as I type this to know that this groper actually touched the woman’s gential area with nothing more than, presumably, her underwear, acting as a barrier.”

            Yep. Multiply by god-knows-how-many. Carolyn Durand comes to mind. Logic dictates many more. And remember Sommer Gentry’s experience — the TSA criminal shoved the metal detector wand up into her.

          • RonBonner

            It wouldn’t surprise me to find out that TSA has ensured none of the pat down areas receive video coverage. Why collect evidence against your own employees.

          • Daisiemae

            Same reason they fight so hard to keep people from filming the pat downs. They don’t want any evidence collected against their employees and their crimes.

          • “Same reason they fight so hard to keep people from filming the pat downs. They don’t want any evidence collected against their employees and their crimes.”

            At one point that was surely true. But by now, so many gropes have been filmed, so much publicity about TSA behavior has been disseminated, I don’t think they care. Sure, they still try to lie about photography being permitted and intimidate people, because that’s what authoritarians do.

            But they and we all know that they get away with whatever they want. There’s been no hue and cry in the land over the abuse. On the contrary, it’s accepted as the norm. Only a few of us see these assaults for what they are. Only a few of us call them crimes. All the evidence in the world hasn’t made a bit of difference.

          • RonBonner

            #2: TSA refuses to screen the passenger.

  • Chris Bray

    File a criminal complaint. Ask for airport police, and report a sexual assault. If the Total Sexual Assault wants to pretend that full genital massage isn’t policy, then it shouldn’t be regarded as official behavior when it happens.

    Also, as always, I wish these public complaints named names. What was the name of the blue-shirted sex offender who committed this sexual assault?

    • Chris, I doubt she (or her companion) thought to look for a name. They were taken aback. Yes, it’s hard to believe that, four years on, people still don’t know what’s going on at airports in this country every day, but the fact is they don’t. So if they’re caught unawares, they tend not to think of details like Name & Shame.

      • Chris Bray

        Maybe the police can figure it out when they conduct their sexual assault investigation.

        On the subject of politicians never responding to letters about the TSA, I wrote to our district attorney a couple of years ago to ask him if he would consider prosecuting TSA clerks who showed too much personal enthusiasm for genital security massage. Never did get an answer, never did expect one. But if no one will ever prosecute a TSA clerk for sexual assault, and if they realize no one will ever prosecute them, the crotch probing will only ever get more and more aggressive.

        • Which is exactly what I predicted when this regime was announced in January of 2010. I kept warning and warning and warning, and none of my friends/colleagues gave a shit. Then when it went nationwide in October 2010, I started again. And still nobody gave a shit. That’s why I say, incessantly, that I wish for them all the grope of a lifetime.

          To say I have a powerful reserve of schadenfreude stored up is an understatement.

  • RonBonner

    Figure the TSA to trash thousands of perfectly working HHMD’s.

  • Daisiemae

    Sickening.

  • Susan Richart

    Rather than or in addition to a TSA complaint form. Ms. Kimbrough needs to complete and submit this form also:

    http://www.oig.dhs.gov/hotline/hotline.php

    I know there are naysayers out there, but I am convinced complaining to the OIG can work. Give as much information as is possible about what happened.

  • Susan Richart

    Under her dress!?!?!?!?!??!!!

    “They got the woman who was groping me out of the way and brought in a boss, who tried to stop the situation from escalating.”

    Was the crotch the last part of the grope or just the beginning? What did the boss do? Did he/she call in another person to continue the grope?

    • My understanding is that the groping was already finished by that time. The man was yelling; the supervisor appeared. Maybe because said supervisor was afraid somebody might start throwing punches? That’s probably their policy now; who knows? People are getting groped every day and nobody’s throwing punches, so this apparent fear on the part of the TSA is bullshit.

      The supe handed him a complaint form. They went on their way.

      Oh, and groping under the dress is nothing new. We’ve got lots of testimony from women about that,

      • Susan Richart

        Thanks. Now I understand getting the groper out of the way – before she got slugged.