TSA goons steal woman’s shoes, bracelet at BWI

In the never-ending saga of TSA theft and stupidity — and did I say theft? — we have the latest episode (that we know of): at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, the goons spied yet another tasty treat they wanted to sample. So they pretended that said items were dangerous and confiscated them — er, sorry, encouraged the passenger to give them up. (As we know, since they tell us all the time, especially at their main propaganda organ, they don’t confiscate anything.) From the story in the Baltimore Sun:

The shoes, which had stiletto heels in the shape of handgun barrels and also featured what looked like bullets, were in the woman’s carry-on luggage, TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein said.

Readers of this blog will recall that in 2013 the TSA also stole a pair of Chanel shoes, a two-inch toy gun belonging to a sock monkey, and in 2014 several bottles of Jimmy Choo perfume.

These scary terroristy things could’ve harmed you and your fellow travelers! Aren’t you glad the TSA is Keeping You Safe?!

Regular readers will also recognize the name of Lisa Farbstein as yet another of the TSA’s many lying flacks.

“We want to remind travelers that they should not bring replica guns or ammunition to checkpoints,” Farbstein said in an email. “It will definitely slow them down, slow down their traveling companions who are waiting for them, and it will slow down the checkpoint lines for other travelers.”

Way to blame it on the passengers, Farbstein.

Here’s the comment I left at the Baltimore Sun article. Go on over and give it some love, and add comments of your own, before they remove it:

  • Lisa Simeone

This agency is full of molesters and morons. (Let’s see how long this comment is allowed to stand.) Everyone who defends this criminal agency deserves what he gets, and, paraphrasing Mencken, I hope he gets it good and hard.

They wanted to steal her shoes and bracelet; that’s why they stopped her. And if you don’t know the TSA steals from travelers all the time, you have your head somewhere other than where it should be. The TSA confiscated a 2-inch toy gun from a sock monkey:
http://tsanewsblog.com/12236/news/tsa-seizes-terroristy-sock-monkey-confiscates-gun/

And they stole another women’s shoes, again because they wanted them:
http://tsanewsblog.com/11216/news/tsa-outdoing-its-own-stupidity-at-every-turn/

They’ve also stolen several perfume bottles because they were supposedly shaped like — gasp! — a grenade. But yeah, it’s all for your safety. And to fight The Terrorists who are Hiding Around Every Corner!

(Photo courtesy of your tax dollars)

Cross-posted at ABombazine

UPDATE ALREADY: Not 10 minutes later, the Sun censored my comment. Surprise surprise!

  • RB
  • Joey Bach

    Here is a thought… if she does return to that airport, should she be able to collect her shoes?

    I look at it as if the agency does not want to let it fly, they should be able to store it until the passenger returns.

    • Joey Bach

      I saw the 4 points on the TSA blog for what you can do with your “prohibited” property. I think the procedure needs to be modified — a TSA employee needs to escort the passenger and get the passenger quickly to an airline counter to ensure the item gets to it’s proper destination without any extra charges to the passenger.

      • But that’s rational. The TSA isn’t rational. And not interested in being rational. The TSA is about power. Power and control. That’s the point. Helping people get their property back — property the TSA is only too glad to steal — isn’t on their agenda.

  • RB

    Once again TSA needs to break out their very dusty copy of Funk & Wagnalls and look up the term Realistic Replica. I’m afraid TSA’s real challenge will be in finding someone who can read,

  • Amy Alkon

    They’re protecting themselves from comparison to their fashion betters.

  • Dolt

    I made some neccesssary responses in the article comments:

    @IsabellaF @larryag

    So mocking and laughing what a private citizen chooses to wear or posses
    is the proper response when that citizen’s rights have been violated
    and possessions stripped from them by the government with no cause?
    Shameful. I hope you get a real good TSA treatment next time you fly.
    We will all be here to laugh at your expense.

    @IsabellaF

    If you are not aware that the TSA is full of molesters and thieves and
    domestic abusers, then please read up and educate yourself on the people
    who are feeling you up every time you fly and who you are implicitly
    making excuses for.

    • And they’ve already censored your first one, the “mocking and laughing” one. I’m going to repost it, and I ask that everyone here do likewise. Keep re-posting it, or some version of it, and see if one of them gets through.

      • Dolt

        Interesting. All I did was wish them a good TSA treatment. The Baltimore Sun is the one who must have believed it was a negative comment. What does that say about how they actually perceive the TSA? It doesn’t correlate to what they publish, that’s for sure.

        • BaltimoreTwerp is another one (he calls himself BaltimoreTerp). As you can see, he’s in the mix again, doing what he does best — being an asshole. He’s a regular at the Sun, and for whatever reason he has a particular animus against me. That’s why I usually ignore him. Though I’d love to see someone like Deborah Newell Tornello put him in his place!

  • John Pistol’s Groin

    The Amount of TSA faggotry here is TO DAMN HIGH

  • Onetinythought

    Of all the stupid, grabasstic, moronic, mouth breathing, ignorant dumbass things to do. Way to go, again, tsa. You bunch of idiots.

  • The Sun is going nuts with censoring comments. They’ve already censored 4 of mine, including the most benign statements. Here’s the latest I left, which has already disappeared. It’s in answer to Larry; his comment first:

    larryag
    @Lisa Simeone
    when a plane blows up you will blame them , TSA is not criminal
    but the heel of the foot is about 5 1/2 inches from the ground it seems
    I agree with Isabella that it’s a fashion crime

    Lisa Simeone
    @larryag

    Oh, what a load. On all counts.

    First of all, you need some brushing-up on your arithmetic. A 7.5-inch heel combined with a 3.5-inch platform is the equivalent of a non-platform stiletto with a 4-inch heel, something many women wear with no problem. At least give me credit for knowing a little more about this than you do.

    Second, I also know more about the TSA than you do. Sorry, but it’s true. I’d post a link, but the guard dogs here will censor my comment. So please go to TSA News Blog dot com and take a stroll.

    • Dolt

      Why would a media source remove critical comments? Are they not interested in the truth? Are they not interested in their own integrity? Do they not care about the actual facts? Or do they just want to spread propaganda?

      Yes, I know the answer.

  • dogmatix

    Never take anything valuable or unique with you on a trip. This lady had the shoes in her carry-on, but if they had been in her checked bag they probably would have disappeared as well.

    “…the reasonable person takes into account the conduct of others and regulates his own conduct accordingly. A reasonable person must even foresee the unlawful or negligent conduct of others if the situation warrants.”

    You can’t take anything for granted when dealing with the TSA, especially when it comes to ethics or common sense.

    • Daniel FX Dravot

      Upon returning from my father’s funeral I placed a display box containing his military decorations, including those for gallantry in combat, from WWII, Korea and Viet Nam in my hold baggage instead of my carry-on. When reclaiming my baggage from the carousel I saw the bag had been opened – the latches were unsecured and the bag was held closed, more or less, by the straps.

      A TSA employee and his supervisor stated that, except for listed contraband, TSA employees never took passenger’s belongings and that my complaint must be a fabrication. That my wife and daughter attested to the facts and we offered photographs made no difference. The supervisor then suggested that the suitcase had not been properly closed and that the box may just have fallen out. In any case it wasn’t his problem.

      I am unable today to be surprised at any tale of malfeasance by government employees.

      • For what it’s worth, there’s no way to tell whether the TSA or airline baggage handlers stole your property. And there are just as many horror stories coming out of airports where private security is on duty — such as Covenant Security at San Francisco. Govt or non-govt employees isn’t the point.

      • Susan Richart

        File a complaint here about the screeners implying that you were lying and their general attitude: https://www.oig.dhs.gov/hotline/hotline.php

        Copy and past your two paragraphs into the narrative section of the form. Hopefully, you were above to get names. If not, give full descriptions, time, place, etc.

        File a claim here for the missing items: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/passenger-support/claims

        I believe TSA videos the baggage search area. Ask for that video.

        TSA will also tell you that they always leave a notice of inspection when they have opened your bags, but that’s not so especially if something has been stolen.

        Finally, expect it to take at least 6 months for TSA to process your claim.

        • Daniel FX Dravot

          Thank you very much indeed for your kind response. The recounted incident took place several years ago. Since then my daughter – my bright and shining star – has graduated from law school (with honours) and has looked into this. At this remove the likelihood of a favourable (to us) outcome is remote at best.

          I now categorize this event as another instance of blood over the dam.

  • Dolt

    LOL We are all safez now!!d!11!

    • OK, explanation, please. Though I’ve been searching entries at the Urban Dictionary, I still can’t figure out what “!!d!11!” or even “d!11” means.

      • Dolt

        Oh sorry to make you search on my ridiculousness. There is absolutely no meaning. Years ago in comments or the old AOL messenger, the way one would demonstrate an overly hyper or excited person was to add a bunch of Exclamation points mixed with some number 1’s (because exclamation point on the keyboard is Shift+1 and an overly zealous person may not type it so perfect). So when I was making my absurd comment as someone who would be overly obnoxious in their support for TSA and security, I noticed on my phone’s keyboard that the exclamation point shared the “d” key rather than the 1. I accidentally inserted a “d” in the middle of my exclamation points on accident, found it to be amusing and left it, then went on to use the old demonstration of how that used to happen with some 1’s in there as well.

        Not only is it meaningless, but it is very silly. Just like the story.

  • Oh, and the Sun put this story on the front page under the heading “Crime.” I kid you not. Screenshot:

    • Amy Alkon

      The crime is that our civil liberties are yanked from us daily at airports across America and people just don’t care.

      • Exactly. I wish you would go over to the Baltimore Sun and tell them that, especially the nimrods in the comments section.

        • Amy Alkon

          I tried a bunch of times to get in there and there’s something wrong. Besides the fact that they’re nimrods.

    • TestJeff Pierce

      Apparently West Baltimore has killed more American citizens in 3 months than airline passengers have killed American citizens in the last 15 years.

      I don’t understand why they don’t have nude body scanners and criminal pat downs on every block in West Baltimore? A civilian workforce (they can wear brown shirts) can molest everyone and keep the city safe.

  • Jadeveon Clowney

    Wow. That didn’t take long. Pretty pathetic that a newspaper won’t allow critical reader comments.

    • You can say that again. I can’t wait till my subscription runs out — one more month — then I can cancel.